Tips And Tricks For Planning A Bathroom Remodel

It’s really a pain to blog from my cell phone and my part 1 post a few days ago was really incomplete. Here’s to a sleepless night – I’ve been up for hours – and a couple of hours to do a little blogging.

Tear out the existing piping (Photos 5 and 6). Then frame the 2×6 walls that will contain the new plumbing and the opposite end of the shower base (Photos 8, 9 and 14). It’s easiest to nail the bottom plate to the floor and the top plate to the ceiling, then fill in the studs one at a time by toenailing them in at the top and bottom. Stack the studs directly in front of the old ones wherever possible. Space the studs in the center of the shower about 12 in. apart to leave room for the shower valve and showerhead. The studs behind the toilet should be spaced exactly 19-3/4 in. apart for securing this toilet chair carrier (Photos 8 and 15).

Above the toilet was a large oak cabinet that was removed and I am still searching for the perfect shelves. The mirror ($29.96) replaced an oak medicine cabinet that too was removed. We updated a rectangular box light with this lovely nickel light ($64.97 similar found here ) and the one piece sink/counter combo was updated with quartz and a white porcelain sink ($135.20). The wall color is Opaline by Sherwin Williams (SW 6189 $60).

Shower panels are devices designed to replace the shower head in your tub or shower. An attractive panel, usually of stainless steel aluminum or glass, is hung in the tub or shower enclosure and will typically have several spray heads spread over it. The photo above is fairly typical of shower panels in general. Adding a shower panel is ideal for those doing a bathroom remodel on a budget; they are relatively inexpensive and easy to install.

Walk through the room and note the traffic patterns. Move the pieces around you find an arrangement that works with the space and with the traffic flow. That is, do not block access to other rooms or doors with furniture arrangements or individual pieces. You will want to direct traffic while allowing easy access to pathways in, out of, and around the room.